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Social Studies

The Social Studies Department is dedicated to providing students with an education in Social Studies with both rigorous and challenging standards that will prepare them for success at the college level. The stable and structured environment of the Academy better allows students to focus on the academic challenges facing them and produces more cooperative learning situations. By incorporating the Benedictine values of service, respect, mutual support, and the value of work in the classroom, the Social Studies department will better enable students to be life-long learners and produce good citizens for the 21st Century.
 
World Cultures (7): This is a survey course that examines major world civilizations. The purpose is to enable students to understand the development of the world community within the context of history by examining their connections to the past. This prepares students for a future as participants in a global society.

Arkansas/United States History 8:  This is a study of Early American History coupled with a survey of Arkansas History. The American History course covers Pre History through the Civil War. Topics should include such areas as colonization, the American Revolution, Constitutional History, the Jeffersonian Era, the Jacksonian Era, the development of slavery, Manifest Destiny, and the Civil War.  Coupled with American History will be coverage of events in Arkansas from exploration through the Civil War and Arkansas’s role in American History, especially Benedictine Monasticism in Arkansas.
 
Civics: This is a required semester course which is a study of the key themes of democracy and the dynamics of citizenship within the United States. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the United States government and the components of its institutions.  Current U. S. domestic and International events that impact the individual’s role as a citizen will also be explored. 
 
Economics:  This is a required semester course which is a study of major economic systems. Students will study aspects of personal finances with the goal of becoming better-informed members of the free enterprise system. 
 
Western Civilization:  This is a required year-long course. It is the study of the evolvement of Western Culture from the Ancient Civilizations that developed along the Nile River and those of Mesopotamia to the development of the Americas.  Students will develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the development of Western Culture.
 
United States History: This is a required year-long course that covers the history of the United States from 1492 through the modern-day. Emphasis will be placed on the survey method while introducing students to higher levels of critical thinking.  Students will be able to identify and analyze primary and secondary sources, engage in various critical thinking exercises, as well as recognize and explain factors that contribute to the social, political, and economic essence behind historical events.   
 
History of World War II: This is a semester elective that examines the causes, the course, and the implications of World War II. It covers most of the geographic areas involved; the major diplomatic, political and military events; and some of the key figures of the war. The course will cover the time period of 1918 to present, with an emphasis on the years 1939-1945.

Prerequisites:  Western Civilization and the United States History
 
Native American History: This is a semester elective which surveys the history of Native Americans from the period before European colonization to recent times. The course deals primarily with events in what became the United States. Particular attention is paid to the interrelations among American Indians and Europeans.

Prerequisites:  Western Civilization and the United States History
 
Political Ideologies: This course is a semester elective that is the study of the development of the different types of ideologies and their impact on modern society.  Students will come to understand the conditions that have occurred that made the development of political ideologies necessary.  They will study when and where these ideologies have been applied and the outcomes they have produced.

Prerequisites:  Civics
 
United States Foreign Relations:  This course is a semester elective that is the study of the evolvement of United States Foreign Policy from the foundation through the George W. Bush administration.  Students will understand the different types of foreign policy models, the models that each administration has used, the way they have been applied to other countries, and the results of these applications.

Prerequisites:  Civics

Advanced Placement Economics: This is a semester course that covers principles of college-level courses in either microeconomics or macroeconomics. The semester of microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.  the semester of macroeconomics gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole with particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination. It develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and International Economics. (AP Economics Course Guide)

Prerequisites: Approval of the Department and Academic Dean
 
Advanced Placement United States Government:  This is a year-long elective course designed to provide students with the opportunity to study the US Government from a more analytical and critical point of view than a general survey civics course.  Emphasis will be placed on the ability to think critically and analytically about the bases of federal, state and local government; the bases for the US Constitution; politics and participation; the bases for public policy and bureaucracy. This course also is designed to prepare students for the annual National AP US Government Exam; by covering a broad range of material based upon what government is and the role government has played, and continues to play, in the lives of US citizens. AP United States Government alternates with AP United States History.

Prerequisites: Approval of the Instructor and Academic Dean
 
Advanced Placement United States History: This is a year-long elective that covers the history of the United States of America from the year 1492 through the modern-day.  The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study US history from a more analytical and critical point of view than a general survey history course.  Emphasis will be placed on the ability to think critically and analytically about historical events, as well as essay writing. This course also is designed to prepare 11th and 12th grade students for the annual National AP US History Exam; by covering a broad range of material dealing with both primary and secondary sources, as well as developing the ability to identify, explain and analyze factors which contribute to the social, political and economic essence behind historical events.  AP United States History alternates with AP United States Government.

Prerequisites: Approval of the Instructor and Academic Dean